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Gunthar

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Oh, well my main cencern is what those of us under 18 need for eye/face protection, as the ams rules and the d-day adventure park website don't have any information about that. Right now it looks like no distinction, but i'd prefer to play it safe.

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Off the topic of safety, what are the face protection rules for those under 18? (16 and 14 to be precice)

I'll wear a paintball mask, but surely aren't looking forward to it. I'm looking into those low pros, but don't want to spend $100+ on eyewear I won't be able to use.

Also, this being my first ams event, does anyone have any advice as to needed gear for the op? I'm not going on any idam or dams. My current setup is as follows:

Jpc repro with bfg ten speeds

Headset and comms (talkabout style)

Sling

Extra batteries and spare

An mre, in my mbss with a hydration pouch (1.5-2 L)

Protien bars in an admin pouch

Speedloader and ammo in mbss

1911 and extra mags

Helmet

Gloves

Bug Spray

Combat shirt, short sleeved ua shirt underneath

Waterproofed boots and socks (camp dry is gold)

Please, any suggestions are welcome, especially when they come while i have time to act on!

 

Make sure you bring at least one extra battery and a speedloader with BB's onto the field with you. I do not kid when I say you could be at a respawn almost a mile away from your stuff so keep what you need to keep going with you at all times. 

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Someone brought up something that jogged a memory with me from the last BH.

 

COMMS: If you have a talkabout or other small type of radio get ready for disappointment because odds are you will rarely be able to hear or talk to anyone outside of visual distances. The terrain kicks the butts of pretty much any non high wattage radio. We were supposed to have repeaters and other comms gear last year but it never really materialized. Good comms is key to winning however go ahead and expect for your comms to not work or for everyone to be on the wrong channel. Comms last year on the UFS side were crazy, it got so bad that Top simply gave up and just went around yelling orders out to everyone.

 

This would be a good thing to bring up to AMS staff. Instead of every single squad getting their own channel then every little group of 3 or 4 guys making up their own why not limit the official comms to platoon and above so that we keep the channels a little more cleaned up than they were last year. With so many people using comms it can get confusing.

 

Also please tell me that there will be no more instances of groups or individuals using comms to spy on units and send false orders because that really killed the fun last year.

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The math:

3 factions - one command frequency each = 3 freq

5 platoons per faction - one platoon level freq each = 15 freq

4 squads per platoon - one squad freq each = 20 freq

AMS internal communications - 1 freq

"911" - 1 freq

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Total: 40 Frequencies.

 

And that's not including a few other needs not listed here.

 

Understand that we've got 22 channels to choose from. This means that someone has to share. It makes the most sense that squads share. 

 

There is no denying it, hills and valleys wreak havok with RF. The problem is that everyone thinks that a powerful radio will solve all their communications problems - this just isn't so. And it is even less so when you put hundreds of people on a very limited number of channels - people end up jamming each other all over the place.

 

Instead of a 500mw radio jamming those around you - limited to a few hundreds of meters, the valley you are in, etc, people are walking around with 4 and 5watt radios that are now jamming their peers a mile away. It is an arms race.

 

Then there is the issue of reception: Having a more powerful radio MIGHT make it easier for your team to hear you, but it won't help you hear them at all. What you really need is a high gain antenna. If you replace your stock antenna with an antenna that has a gain of 3dbi you'll effectively be doubling the amount of radiated power (that's the technical term for it, effective radiated power, ERP), and, more importantly, you'll be receiving double the signal you were before. This means that you'll hear people further away (without them needing to increase their output power), they'll hear you better, and you'll have better battery life (because you can drop your transmit power). 

 

However, you'll still suffer the problem of massive amounts of interference because you'll still be receiving those hundreds of other players nearby.

 

The solution? Use your (short range, tactical) radio for what it was intended - communicating with those in your squad. If everyone were to drop to normal FRS power limits (500mw) you'd still be able to communicate with your squad in a tactical environment. No, you won't be able to talk from the camp area to the airfield (you can't do that now, but you'll be able to communicate from one side of Colleville to the other, or from the Spawn south of Colleville to your squad in Caen. This solution only works if EVERYONE makes the change, which we all know won't happen.

 

If you ever need to find your squad after being separated (after a nap, lunch, spawn, helo ride, etc), find a squad leader or platoon leader, they'll help you find your squad - that is part of their job. 

 

tl&dr: The field isn't the only thing that makes comms difficult during game day, everyone using 4-5watt radios plays a huge role.

 

Expect some changes with this years comm matrix that should alleviate some of these issues. Or make them worse...we'll see. 

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Definitely gonna pick up some pontoon sets from SKDtac so I get some proper ventilation between my body and my Banshee. Don't want to over heat because I wasn't prepared.

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For me being skinny yet broad chested and having a rather thick dummy plate in my vest I think it might help a bit by keeping the plate off my chest. Plus as you said the comfort factor is there as well, better than having something like a board push against your chest all day.

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I've never been to broken home, and won't until a later one. But just a tip I've learned from living in the south during summer and reading a lot about the vietnam era, carry as much water as possible. Then it was a normal load to carry four 1 liter canteens. If your not resting or shooting, be drinking something.

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-Use Permathrin on your uniform/tent. It will keep all the nasties away.

 

-Make sure you're drinking somma dat dere water. My first Broken Home I was dilligent about it, and was great during the op. My second go around I wasn't, and felt like a raisin by the end of the first day.

 

-Use some sunscreen...a sunglasses tan isn't that cool.

 

-Personally, I cut the sleeves off of my combat shirt. All they did was get in the way, and I wanted to show off my biceps.

 

-I highly recommend keeping snacks, extra water, and whatever else you don't want to lost out on the field in a pouch or something. Due to the terrain, and hiking up/sliding down it, I lost all of my goodies on the first day and had to hike back to the camping site to go eat.

 

-Take breaks...seriously. The game lasts the entire weekend. Missing 45 minutes of it to take a breather and chill with the guys isn't going to ruin your time. Whatever vital moment you think is going on will happen again. I promise.

 

-Make sure your boots are broken in. My first ruck march in the Army tought me that.

 

-Maps/GPS are good to have, but not crucial.

 

-Comms are crucial to have. If for nothing else, to listen to the Top and have a heads up on what is going on around you, or where you are needed.

 

-Technicals can definitely save you from doing that thing that I hate so much...walking.

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-Personally, I cut the sleeves off of my combat shirt. All they did was get in the way, and I wanted to show off my biceps.

 

We had two members who did this on Saturday and received second degree sunburns.  Definitely do not recommend this.

 

YMMV

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We had two members who did this on Saturday and received second degree sunburns.  Definitely do not recommend this.

 

YMMV

 

Why was sunscreen not used then? I'd rather keep as cool as possible with a little sunscreen on my arms rather than wearing long sleeves.

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Why was sunscreen not used then? I'd rather keep as cool as possible with a little sunscreen on my arms rather than wearing long sleeves.

My old rule on sunscreen is the same rule for bug repellant - if you don't want it bitten or burned, screen it and spray it.

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Re: combat shirt sleeves. I get the "chop 'em off and sunscreen up" thing. I put sunblock on my face, ears and back of my neck.

 

For me, though, I keep the sleeves. Unlike sunblock, sleeves protect me from all the stickers, twigs, branches, rocks and gravel universally present in outdoor fields.

 

But to each their own.

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Re: combat shirt sleeves. I get the "chop 'em off and sunscreen up" thing. I put sunblock on my face, ears and back of my neck.

 

For me, though, I keep the sleeves. Unlike sunblock, sleeves protect me from all the stickers, twigs, branches, rocks and gravel universally present in outdoor fields.

 

But to each their own.

 I'm all sleeved up to hell at DDAP, for exactly the same reasons you are. Plus, the day that I don't will be the day I go right into a hill of ants.

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Helpful hints from the Ol' DOC,,,,

 

HYDRATE, HYDRATE, HYDRATE!!!!

 

Dog tick & flea collars around your ankles/boot-tops or attached to your LBE help keep the creepy crawlies off you.

 

Sunscreen all exposed skin.

 

Wear  knee-high nylons or nylon dress socks under your boot socks the prevent foot blisters.

 

Wear a boonie hat that shades your face and neck. Wet the hat down frequently.

 

Get a FROG-TOGS cooling towel (Wal-Mart, Target, Academy,,,) They really work.

 

A oversized long sleeve t-shirt under your LBE is a good idea. Also wetting it down will keep you cool.

 

Watch out for the players next to you for signs of heat injury or dehydration and they'll watch out for you.

 

HYDRATE, HYDRATE, HYDRATE!!!!

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